dcsimg
 

Installing SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0

Monday Oct 8th 2018 by Greg Larsen

Greg Larsen offers detailed instructions on how to install SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0.

On September 24 Microsoft announced the release of SQL Server 2019 Community Technical Preview (CTP) 2.0.   I think it is good for database professionals to stay current with technology, so I decided to get my feet wet with SQL Server 2019 and installed this new CTP from Microsoft.  In this article I will show you the three steps I took to install and initially test SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0 on a virtual machine running Windows Server 2016.

Step 1: Obtain the Installation Media

The first thing I did is follow this link to start the process of obtaining the bits for SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/sql-server/sql-server-2019#Install

When I bring up this page in Internet Explorer on my VM machine I get this screen: 

Install SQL Server 2019 on Windows, Linux, and containers
Install SQL Server 2019 on Windows, Linux, and containers

As you can see, I have four different choices for the target operation environments I could use for SQL Server 2019.  As already stated,  I would be installing my instance of SQL Server 2019 on a Window Server 2016 installation, so I picked the “Windows” installation setup from the above options. 

When I clicked on the link in the Windows installation type, the following screen was displayed: 

Preview SQL Server 2019 for Windows
Preview SQL Server 2019 for Windows

By clicking on the “Preview SQL Server 2019 for Windows” link above,  I am taken to the evaluation center for product family SQL Server 2019 CTP.   In order to get the 180-day evaluation edition of SQL Server 2019, I had to provide name, email address, phone number, etc.    

Once I provided all my personal information I was then prompted to run or save the following exe file: SQLServerVNext-SSEI-Eval.exe.  I saved it to my VM machine.  I then executed SQLServerVNext-SSEI-Eval.exe, which then prompted me to select one of the following installation types:

Select an Installation Type
Select an Installation Type

As you can see there are three different installation types I could use:  Basic, Custom, and Download Media.   I decided I just wanted to download the media, so I clicked on the “Download Media” option.  When the download process starts the following page is displayed:

Specify SQL Server Installer Download
Specify SQL Server Installer Download

On this screen I can select my language, the kind of package I would like to download (ISO or CAB), and the location where I want to store the installation image.  I just took the defaults and clicked on the “Download” button.   This started the download process and displays the following downloading media progress screen:

Downloading Media Progress Screen
Downloading Media Progress Screen

Once the download completed I got the following successful download screen:

Successful Download Screen 
Successful Download Screen

By reviewing my download location, I can see the following ISO  image got downloaded: SQLServerVnextCTP2-x64-ENU.iso.

Now that my SQL Server Installation ISO file is available, I can move on to the installation step for SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0.

Step 2: Install SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0

To Install the new version of SQL Server 2019, I first mounted the ISO image to my virtual machine and then browsed the ISO image to see what it contained:

SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0 ISO Image
SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0 ISO Image

Look familiar?  To start my installation, I double-click on the “setup” file, which brings up the following “SQL Server Installation Center” dialog box:

SQL Server Installation Center Dialog Box
SQL Server Installation Center Dialog Box

 I started my installation by clicking on the “Installation” link on the left panel above, which brings up the following “Product Key” dialog box:

Product Key Dialog Box
Product Key Dialog Box

On this screen I take the defaults, which is to install the free 180-day evaluation edition.  To move on with the installation process I click the “Next” button, which displays the following dialog box:

SQL Server Installation Center 
SQL Server Installation Center

Under the “Installation” items I selected the “New SQL Server stand-alone installation or add features to an existing installation” item.  When I clicked on this item the following “Licensing Terms” dialog box is displayed:

License Terms
License Terms

I check the “I accept the licensing terms…” item and then click on the “Next” button, which brings up the following “Global Rules” window:

Global Rules
Global Rules

This screen is only displayed for a few seconds before disappearing, and then the “Microsoft Update” dialog box is displayed:

Microsoft Update 
Microsoft Update

In this dialog box I check the “Use Microsoft Update to check for updates (recommended)” option.  By doing this my installation would look to see if there are any updates from Microsoft.  After checking the box, I then click on the “Next” button which displays the following dialog box:

Install Setup Files
Install Setup Files

This screen is displayed while the installation process is scanning for updates.  Once the update scanning process has completed, the following “Install Rules” dialog box is displayed:

Install Rules
Install Rules

I can see that I have only a Window Firewall rule warning.  I ignored this for now and clicked on the “Next” button. Doing this brings up the following “Feature Selection” dialog box:   

Feature Selection
Feature Selection

I reviewed the list of feature items available to SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0.  At this time I have only found one new item, which is the “Java connector for HDFS data sources”, which can be found under the “PolyBase Query Services for External Data” item.   I decided to click on the “Select All” button.  I did this, so my installation will contain all the SQL Server 2019 features.  Not sure I’m going to test all the features, but at least I will install all of them, if I can.  Once I selected all the features I clicked the “Next” button.  When I do this the following “Features Rules” dialog box is displayed:

Feature Rules
Feature Rules

As you can see I got one failure and one warning.

By looking in the bootstrap log file directory for my installation (location of bootstrap log files: C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\150\Setup Bootstrap\Log\) I can find more information about the warning and failed statuses.   

Here is a subset of my bootstrap log file that shows why I got the above “warning” status:

Bootstrap Log File
Bootstrap Log File

As you can see, the C++ redistributable is required should I want to use a “Polybase Teradata Connector”.  Since I will not be using Teradata I ignore this warning.

To understand why I got the “Failed” message I review this subset of bootstrap log file messages:

Subset of Bootstrap Log File
Subset of Bootstrap Log File

As you can see my machine is missing the Java Runtime environment.  To resolve this issue, I need to install the Oracle JRE.   To install the Oracle JRE, I went out and downloaded the latest JRE from the following location: https://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jre10-downloads-4417026.html.

When I go to this web page the following is displayed:

Java SE Runtime Environment 10 Downloads
Java SE Runtime Environment 10 Downloads

On this page I clicked on the radio button to accept the license and then I selected the correct version to download for the OS that I’m using for my SQL Server 2019 installation.

Once the Java runtime exe is download I execute it, to start the install of the Java SE Runtime 10 environment on my virtual machine.  Once the Java runtime is installed, I then clicked on the Re-Run button on the “Feature Rules” dialog box to revalidate the installation, as shown below:

Re-Run Button on the “Feature Rules” Dialog Box
Re-Run Button on the “Feature Rules” Dialog Box

With the installation of the new JRE installed I no longer got the JRE failure, as the screenshot below shows:

Feature Rules
Feature Rules

As you can see the failed status regarding JRE has now disappeared.  At this point I only have one warning, which I’m going to ignore because I’m not going do any testing of PolyBase against a Terradata data source.

I proceed to the next step by clicking on the “Next” button, which brings up the  following “Instance Configuration” dialog box:

Instance Configuration
Instance Configuration

On this “Instance Configuration” screen, I have the choice to install a default instance, or named instance.   I’ll just take the default and choose to create a default instance.    To move on with my installation I click on the “Next” button, which displays the “PolyBase Configuration” options:

PolyBase Configuration
PolyBase Configuration

For PolyBase I just take the defaults and click on the “Next” button, which moves me on to the “Server Configuration” dialog box:

Server Configuration
Server Configuration

At this point, I’m just testing SQL Server 2019 so I’m just going to take the defaults for the Service Accounts and Collation by clicking the “Next” button. Normally for a production installation I would make sure the accounts used for the services follow industry best practices, and our SQL Server Installation standards.

The next item to configure is database engine configuration:

Database Engine Configuration
Database Engine Configuration

For my test instance I am going to use “Windows authentication mode”, so I make sure that radio button is selected.  I also I add myself as the SQL Server administrator by clicking on the “Add Current User” button.  If I don’t add someone as an administrator I get an error.  Next, I click on the “Data Directories” tab, to see where my instance data will be stored. 

Data Directories Tab
Data Directories Tab

I just accepted these defaults and click the “TempDB” tab to display the default configurations for TempDB:

Number of Files
Number of Files

I can see the default configuration for my install only has TempDB 1 mdf file. Since multiple mdf files for TempDB are considered a best practice,  I changed that to 4 and then click on the FILESTREAM tab.

Below is the file stream configuration dialog box: 

File Stream Configuration
File Stream Configuration

At this point I’m not sure I’ll be doing any FILESTREAM testing, so for now I’m going to keep it disabled.  If I do want to perform some FILESTREAM activities later then I can always enable this feature.   At this point I click on the “Next” button to move on the Analysis Services Configuration:

Analysis Services Configuration
Analysis Services Configuration

Once again I click on the “Add Current User” button to set the current user to be the admin of Analysis Services.   I take defaults for the other configuration items and click on the “Next” button, which brings up the following integration services configuration dialog box:

Integration Services Configuration Dialog Box
Integration Services Configuration Dialog Box

I just take the defaults for the Master Node and click on the “Next” button, which brings up “Integration Services Scale Out Configuration” for the “Worker-Node” dialog box:

Integration Services Scale Out Configuration
Integration Services Scale Out Configuration

Once again I just take the defaults and then click on the “Next” button to move on, which displays the “Distributed Replay Controller”  dialog box:

Distributed Replay Controller
Distributed Replay Controller

I click on the “Add Current User” button to make sure my account has unlimited access to the distributed replay controller, just in case I might need that access, and then I click on the “Next” button, which displays the “Distributed Replay Client” dialog box:

Distributed Replay Client
Distributed Replay Client

I review the defaults for the Distributed Replay client and then accept the defaults by click on the “Next“ button, which brings up the “Consent to install Microsoft R Open” dialog box.

Consent to install Microsoft R Open
Consent to install Microsoft R Open

I click on the accept button to provide my consent and then I click on the “Next” button (note when I click on the “Accept” button the “Next” button is enable), which takes me to the “Consent to Install Python” dialog. 

Consent to Install Python
Consent to Install Python

Once again I consent to accept the installation of Python and then click on the “Next” button (note once again the Next button is enabled after clicking on the “Accept” button), which brings me to the “Ready To Install” dialog:

Ready To Install
Ready To Install

Finally I have completed defining the configuration for this installation of SQL Server 2019.  As you can see this dialog box displays a summary of my selected configuration.  In this dialog box I move the slider on the right up and down to review the summary configuration for my first SQL Server 2019 CTP2.0 instance.  I also note the path for the for the location of the configuration ini file.  I might use this file later to test an unattended install.   After reviewing the summary, I click on the “Install” button.  This starts the installation process:

Installation Progress
Installation Progress

The installation takes a while to install.  When my installation completes the following completion confirmation dialog box is displayed:  

Completion Confirmation
Completion Confirmation

I review the status of each feature installed by moving the slider on the right up and down.  I do this to verify that all the  features have a “Succeeded” status.  They are all successful.   At this point I have successfully installed SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0 and all of its features on my VM machine.

In order to manange and test out my new SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0 instance I will also need to install SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS).  I decided I’m going to install the latest and greatest version of SSMS on my machine.  To get the latest version of SSMS I use the “Install SQL Server Management Tools” link on the “SQL Server Installation Center” dialog as shown below:

Install SQL Server Management Tools
Install SQL Server Management Tools

When I click on this link the follwong webpage is displayed: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/ssms/download-sql-server-management-studio-ssms?view=sql-server-2017.

Download SQL Server Management Studio
Download SQL Server Management Studio

As you can see the link only brought up a Books Online documenation page.  If you look closesly at this page you can see there is a link to download the preview 4 version for “SQL Server Managmenet Studio 18.0. https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=2014662).  I will be using this preview version of SSMS for my SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0 testing.   By using this link I download the SSMS setup exe (SSMS-Setup-ENU.exe) and saved it to my VM machine.   When I execute this SSMS exe the following dialog is displayed:  

SQL Server Managmenet Studio 18.0
SQL Server Managmenet Studio 18.0

To start the install of SSMS 18.0 I click on the “Install” button.  When I do this, I am shown the following progress dialog while the installation process of SSMS is running:

Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio Progress Bar
Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio Progress Bar

Once the install is complete the following screen is displayed:

Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio Restart
Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio Restart

As you can see a restart of my computer is required.  I click on the “Restart” button to complete the installation of version 18.0 of SSMS.

Step 3: Verify Installation

At this point I have installed SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0 and SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS).  I start my verification process by using SSMS.  When SSMS first starts I see the following screen:

SQL Server Management Studio
SQL Server Management Studio

This window is displayed for a few seconds, but then eventually SSMS starts and the following window is displayed:

 SQL 2019_CTP2 [Running]
SQL 2019_CTP2 [Running]

I connect to the default instance by placing a period (“.”) in the “Server name” item and the click on the “Connect” button.  After SSMS connects this is what I see in the “Object Explorer” window:

Object Explorer Window
Object Explorer Window

As you can see I’m running SQL Server build version 15.0.1000.34, which is the build number for SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0.

If I expand the Database item in Object Explorer I see the following:

Expand the Database
Expand the Database

As you can see I have the normal System Databases (master model, msdb, and tempdb), but I also have the three DW… databases (DWConfiguration, DWDiagnostics, DWQueue).  If you have not seen these databases before they are databases used to support PolyBase.

For my next test I issue the following query against my new SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0 database:

SELECT  
  SERVERPROPERTY('Edition') AS Edition,
  SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion') AS ProductVersion,  
  SERVERPROPERTY('ProductLevel') AS ProductLevel;  
GO  

When I run this code the following is returned:

Query Results
Query Results

Here I can tell I’m running the “Enterprise Evaluation Edition (64-bit)” version of SQL server 2019 CTP2.0.

Are you ready to install SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.0?

You can see it is very easy to install SQL Server 2019 and all the features by just clicking through the different dialog boxes of the installation process. The only real gotcha I ran across was forgetting to install the Oracle JRE prior to installing Polybase.   I think all DBAs should start exploring SQL Server 2019 as a step to get them ready for SQL Server 2019.   I encourage all of you to consider testing out CTP 2.0 of SQL Server 2019.  Are you ready to install SQL server 2019 CTP 2.0 in your environment?

See all articles by Greg Larsen

Home
Mobile Site | Full Site