Open Source Virtualization: Oracle VM enters the Virtualization arena

Friday Nov 23rd 2007 by Tarry Singh
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Part 2 of this series covers downloading Oracle VMServer, VM Manager and VM Source Files, converting the Oracle VM files into ISO files, creating an ESX compatible skeleton and installing the Oracle VM.

Brief intro

Oracle OpenWorld was exciting. The virtualization arena is getting hotter than ever. Oracle unveiled its Oracle VM hypervisor, which is based on Xen open source hypervisor. As of 14 November 2007, SUN’s CEO Jonathan Schwartz unveiled their virtualization strategy with xVM platform; this too is based on Xen, the open source hypervisor from XenSource, the commercial company behind Xen. They originated in Cambridge University, UK and Microsoft backed them back then. In August of this year, they were acquired by Citrix for $500 million. The Xen developers are dedicated to developing the Xen hypervisor and thanks to them, we have yet another option to try out, this time being Oracle’s VM and Sun’s xVM.

Getting the Oracle VMServer, VM Manager and VM Source Files

To get the Oracle VM files do to the following:

  • Go to http://www.oracle.com/oraclevm and click on download; you will be taken to the edelivery site of Oracle, where Oracle distributes its Oracle Enterprise Linux and now also the Oracle VM.
  • Follow the prompts on the screen.

I also ended up getting the 64-bit files.

Converting the Oracle VM files into ISO files, Creating ESX compatible skeleton

This is a simple procedure, since we are using our ESX compatible VM on our VMware workstation, all we have to do is to unzip or unrar the files. You will be left with the following files “OracleVM-Server-2.1.iso” and “OracleVM-Manager-2.1.iso”. Also, make sure that you create your new machine as per the following instructions:

  • Create a new VM with the workstation. Choose WorkStation 5 from the dropdown menu and check the ESX Server compatible check box.

  • Add the following features to make the machine talk directly to your CPU. I typically add 3 NICs for XenMotion, HA and other testing scenarios.
  • #############################################
    # ESX e1000 cards and Intel VT 32 Settings  #
    #############################################
    
    ethernet0.present = "TRUE"
    ethernet0.wakeOnPcktRcv = "FALSE"
    ethernet0.virtualDev = "e1000"
    ethernet0.connectionType = "bridged"
    ethernet0.addressType = "generated"
    ethernet1.present = "TRUE"
    ethernet1.wakeOnPcktRcv = "FALSE"
    ethernet1.virtualDev = "e1000"
    ethernet1.connectionType = "bridged"
    ethernet1.addressType = "generated"
    ethernet2.present = "TRUE"
    ethernet2.wakeOnPcktRcv = "FALSE"
    ethernet2.virtualDev = "e1000"
    ethernet2.connectionType = "bridged"
    ethernet2.addressType = "generated"
    monitor_control.restrict_backdoor = "TRUE"
    monitor_control.vt32 = "TRUE"
    
    #############################################
    

That’s it! You’re done and ready to install your first, shiny Oracle VM in your VMware workstation.

  • Keep the disk space to 20G and do not allocate it all. Obviously, allocating will be best for performance but for a quick install experience, I’d suggest you to go with the unallocated disk space.
  • Choose “any other 2.6 linux kernel” and keep it 64 bit! Why? I got an error even though I had used a 32-bit binary.
  • Close the skeleton out of the workstation and edit the file to add the above-mentioned settings.
  • Open the machine in the workstation and point it to the ISO files as in the diagram below:
  • Start the VM

Installing Oracle VM

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Click enter.

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I usually skip the media check, although it is best practice to do the MD5 check.

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Choose English as the default language.

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Here we choose “us”.

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Here we choose “yes”

Upon being prompted, we choose the “remove all partitions on selected drives and create a default layout” and then select sda, and click “ok”.

Choose “yes”. Note in the picture, it is accidentally set on “no.”

Here we get to see the mount point; apparently, Oracle virtual server/ovs mounted on ocfs2 file system, much like vmware’s vmfs.

Set the boot loader as /dev/sda “Master Boot Record.”

Here, as you see in the extra settings above, we go for our first gigabit adapter eth0 as the management NIC card.

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We pick our home IP address in our IPv4 settings and the required Netmask, which in this case is 255.255.255.0.

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Fill in the Gateway and Primary DNS server. I have a VM, which has a full Windows ads 2003 server running that we will use to run other Oracle software, such as Oracle RAC when we move on to the Xen section of our Oracle RAC virtualization series.

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Add the Oracle VM name manually, “oraclevm.avastu.com’.

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Select your time zone; I chose ‘Europe/Amsterdam’.

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Type the password for the “Oracle VM Agent”, which will be used by the Oracle VM manager.

Choose a secure password for “root.”

Choose “ok.”

Below are a couple of screenshots to see how it goes from here.

We can see the deep integration of the Oracle Virtual Server, kernel-ovs; I am assuming with Xen support.

Reboot the machine.

During the startup, you will be asked to sign this EULA; please read it carefully. I cannot stress this enough, it is a matter of Oracle and Virtualization software, and distributing it is not the right way to go.

Above is a screenshot of a plain console of the oracle Hypervisor or the Oracle VM. You can clearly see the configured NICs and bridges.

Conclusion

We have looked at the virtualization solution of Oracle VM or the new Oracle Hypervisor, which is based on the open source product we all so very well know as Xen. In the last couple of weeks, since VMware’s IPO, the market, investors, and well practically everyone, has acknowledged the presence of virtualization, which VMware has pioneered on the x86 server market. In a future article, we will do the Oracle VM Manager version 2.1 on an Oracle Enterprise Linux 5 platform, after which, we will try to see how we can run other virtualization techniques that Oracle has promised that are not yet available.

» See All Articles by Columnist Tarry Singh

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